By Tabby Besley

Seeking Schools Coordinator Intern

Schools Coordinator Intern

Part-time, unpaid, Wellington-based. 23223118_10213116145990695_363043491_o

InsideOUT is a national youth charity seeking a Schools Coordinator Intern for ten hours a week to support our growing organisation. This position is unpaid and working hours are flexible.

You will be responsible for managing and developing InsideOUT’s relationships with schools and school groups around the country. You will be responsible for overseeing and supporting our national network for schools with rainbow diversity groups/queer-straight alliances.

This will include keeping our schools database up to date, and providing support to schools, students and school groups through distributing resources, and offering advisement over phone, e-mail, and in-person as required. You will also produce a monthly informative and advisory newsletter to these groups and support InsideOUT to engage schools with national campaigns such as the Day of Silence and develop new resources. There will be flexibility to support other parts of InsideOUT’s work based on your skills and interest.

InsideOUT is a growing organisation that works to support youth, whānau, schools, community groups, youth services, government agencies and other relevant organisations to provide safer schools and communities for young people of minority sexualities, genders and sex characteristics.

We are looking for someone with superb networking and communication skills and outstanding knowledge of the challenges faced by sexual, sex, and gender minorities. Experience in the following areas would be an advantage: design, communications, project management, working with schools.
You are self-motivated with strong time management skills, and will work to uphold the vision and mission of InsideOUT. More information about the organisation is available on our website: http://www.insideout.org.nz/

Due to funding restraints this is initially an unpaid intern position for ten hours a week, with the possibility of this turning into a paid position at a later point for the right applicant. The successful applicant will receive reimbursement for any reasonable expenses eg. transport and will have access to free professional development opportunities, mentoring from our National Coordinator, and the opportunity to gain work experience in one of New Zealand’s leading youth charities. You will be eligible for written or phone references from InsideOUT and we are happy to support you to count your hours to volunteering programmes such as VicPlus, or a relevant qualification if appropriate.

Contact us to view a full job description. E-mail your CV and cover letter to tabby@insideout.org.nz by 08/02/18.

 

Seeking Wellington Schools Coordinator

Wellington Schools Coordinator

Part-time; fixed-term (seven months), Wellington-based.12282783_1252664694749028_531932527_n

InsideOUT is a national youth charity seeking a Wellington Schools Coordinator for seven hours a week from February-August, to support our growing work in Wellington schools.

You will also be responsible for managing and developing InsideOUT’s relationships with schools and school groups in Wellington. You will be responsible for overseeing the delivery of a regional network for schools with rainbow diversity groups/queer-straight alliances, currently known as the Wellington QSA Leadership Group.

This will include planning and facilitating monthly meet-ups alongside volunteers and providing support to schools and school groups through resources, and advisement over phone, e-mail, and in-person as required. You will implement an evaluation system for the project and provide monthly reports to the National Coordinator on the progress of the project.

InsideOUT is a growing organisation that works to support youth, whānau, schools, community groups, youth services, government agencies and other relevant organisations to provide safer schools and communities for young people of diverse sexualities, sexes and genders. In the last year we have experienced significant growth of our initiatives such as the nationwide awareness campaign ‘Day of Silence’, our annual youth hui Shift, and our support of schools’ rainbow diversity and Queer Straight Alliance groups.

We are looking for someone with superb organisational and communication skills and outstanding knowledge of the challenges faced by sexual, sex, and gender minorities. Experience in facilitation and previous experience working with young people and schools is strongly desired. You are self-motivated with strong time management skills, and will work to uphold the vision and mission of InsideOUT. More information about the organisation is available on our website: http://www.insideout.org.nz/

Initially this is a seven-month contract for seven hours a week, with the possibility of this being extended. The successful applicant will be paid the living wage. Hours of work are flexible, with the exception of one Sunday afternoon per month.
Contact us to view a full job description. E-mail your CV and cover letter to tabby@insideout.org.nz by 02/01/17 to apply.

IDAHOBIT Report 2017

Here is a copy of the Report that was presented to MPs in Parliament for International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia 2017 (see citation p10). Thank you again to those who responded to the coalition’s quick-fire IDAHOBIT survey. It helped identify the priorities we presented and we included several of your quotes. The survey will not be written up separately at this stage.

IDAHOBIT Report 10.05.17

18486147_1331069236976763_7209970431259439314_nAt the Political Panel Greens and Labour already had policy on the issues we raised so both Jan Logie and Grant Robertson formally agreed to all our Action Points. Peter Dunne spoke in general support from United Future (and on behalf of ACT). The Māori Party sent an apology with a letter of general support. National did not bother to send an MP and the Wellington Central candidate who attended was personally supportive but had not read the Report.

You can listen to the audio recorded from the event here, thanks to PrideNZ. This features both the speakers from the IDAHOBIT Coalition and the representatives of parliament.

The IDAHOBIT Coalition will follow up with the new government after the September election. As well as that, we encourage all organisations and activists to contact government directly to follow up on the issues important to you.

Rainbow Wellington are also holding a Rainbow Election Forum on August 22nd.

19029603_10154547134672823_5648714024504586959_nThis post is made on behalf of the IDAHOBIT Coalition. The coalition was formed to take up the opportunity to speak to cross-parlimentarians ahead of the NZ election and included the Human Rights Commission, Intersex Trust Aotearoa New Zealand, Tiwhanawhana Trust, InsideOUT, Mosaic, Rainbow Wellington, Bella Simpson, Jack Byrne and the Rainbow Cross-Party Parliamentary Group.

Sticks and Stones and Homophobia – Pink Shirt Day 2017

Bullying is everywhere, on the streets, in schools, in homes. It is all around us, every second of every day.

Pink Shirt Day is coming up on Friday, part of Bullying Free Week NZ.  Pink Shirt Day is about working together to stop bullying by celebrating diversity and promoting positive social relationships. It’s about creating a community where all people feel safe, valued and respected, regardless of age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, or cultural background.
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Celebrated annually around the globe, Pink Shirt Day began in Canada in 2007 when two students, David Shepherd and Travis Price, took a stand against homophobic bullying after a new Year 10 student was harassed and threatened for wearing pink. David and Travis bought dozens of pink shirts and distributed them to their male classmates to wear the next day. The word got out online and hundreds of students showed up in pink, some from head-to-toe, to stand together against bullying.

While people from all backgrounds can relate to the experience of being bullied, we believe it is important to highlight the bullying that so many young people today are still experiencing as a result of homophobia, biphobia and transphobia.

Some of the young people and volunteers that InsideOUT works with have chosen to tell their stories this week, with the hope that sharing their experiences may help and guide others, educate them in hopes of preventing what they had to endure, or simply let people know they are not alone in experiencing bullying.

This is one of those stories.

Sticks and stones and homophobia

We were at the park, just hanging out, and we thought no one else was around to see us. It was around Autumn so there were gold and red leaves everywhere and it was beautiful. I thought today we might actually get a break. So I took her hand and just held it, and she smiled at me and we started laughing because it felt nice to be able to do the things that heterosexual couples do all the time without any of the same prejudice.

It wasn’t even five minutes later when two teenage guys came up to us on their bikes with this look of disgust and anger on their faces. I remember the boy on the left having this look on his face as if we’d personally offended him, so at first I thought it was almost comical. Then they started speaking to us. “Are you lesbians? That’s disgusting! That’s not right you know – you shouldn’t be here –  kids come here to play at the playground!” 

They barely let us get a word in. I wanted to just ignore them, but my girlfriend at the time jumped right in after they asked the first question and that was that. I felt bad because I could see their words were affecting her much more than they were affecting me, especially when they said, “Oh I bet it’s because you can’t get a boyfriend!”

I just found hilarious because we’d both been asked out by a few guys by then and I’d already had a pretty serious straight relationship. To me it was ludicrous that that was their best insult. We turned around to leave after that and the guys started throwing stones at us. Luckily none hit, but it was the thought that counted wasn’t it? They wanted to hurt us and see us in pain.

Pink-DayIf anything it hurts me now more than it did then, because I imagine if it wasn’t me but some other girl who’s only fault was that she’d fallen in love with another girl. It hurts because what if it had been another girl who wasn’t as dismissive as me, what if that had been the last straw of hay on the stack for her and she’d gone home with depression weighing on her lungs and had decided she couldn’t take it any more.

Bullying is for cowards who aren’t brave enough to try to express how they really feel from the beginning, before their anger or jealousy or fear builds up and turns them into unfeeling people, blinded by hatred. We need to start being honest about how we feel – and yes that means going the extra mile to be tactful about telling people if they’re annoying us, but that extra bit of effort is better than bullying which so often leads to isolation and suicide.

Our writer has chosen to stay anonymous.

Collated by Brandon Mamea-Crawford. Come back tomorrow for part two in this series!

 

International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia 2017

This was a speech delivered as part of the Political Panel held in Parliament on May 17th 2017 to celebrate International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia. Community leaders spoke on some of our priority issues and MPs from political parties were invited to respond and share what their party would commit to ahead of the election.

Kia ora, I’m Tabby the Founder and National Coordinator of InsideOUT, a national charity that aims to give young people of minority sexualities, genders and sex characteristics a sense of safety and belonging in their schools and communities.

Safety for our young people is one of the biggest issues facing our rainbow communities in Aotearoa and across the globe.  It is important to recognise that all of the issues we talk about tonight are affecting our rangatahi, but some of the most pressing issues are bullying and safety in schools, access to mental health support and transition pathways, and the huge need for resourcing, training and support for our youth organisations across the country who are working in this sector.

IDAHOBIT Speakers

A few weeks ago InsideOUT ran Shift, our national youth hui which brought young people all the way from Whangarei to Invercargill together for four days of workshops, the opportunity for young people to connect with their community, be in a space where they were free to be themselves and take away skills, knowledge inspiration and strength to go back and make change in their own lives and communities. I want to share some quotes from the evaluations that young people who attended filled out – and these are just a few of many similar stories. I want to acknowledge and honour the young people that shared their journeys with us.

I now feel more confident in everyday life, just knowing that there are people like those at the Hui in the world who can remind me that I’m valid and that I’m not alone.

I was pretty close to suicide before the hui in all honesty, everything seemed too far away and I had no one. Now I feel at least like I need to stay alive for the next hui

Before coming to hui I felt completely alone and like nobody understood the struggles I face daily but after connecting with people here I realised I am not alone and I am going away with a new group of friends going through a similar thing. I now feel more hopeful about my future and transition. Being surrounded by people who understand and respect my identity has made me feel less alone and I feel like the new skills I have learnt will have a huge benefit to me in lots of different areas.

I feel like I’m wanted and that I’m loved and that I’m valid

Places like this are so rare that when you find them you have to hold onto them

Young people in NZ’s rainbow communities are five times more likely to attempt suicide, yet the services that are working to save these young people’s lives are constantly struggling and under resourced. Shift is just one example of numerous youth and volunteer-led initiatives around the country where our communities are fighting to create better outcomes for our rangatahi.

I think the quotes I’ve shared illustrate the huge impact that can be had on a young person when they get to experience what it’s like to be in a safe environment, one that validates them, cares for them, empowers them, provides opportunity for meaningful learning and gives them permission to just be themselves. Imagine the possibilities for our young people – our country’s future – if every environment they were in was providing those basic measures for wellbeing – safety and belonging.

Tabby speaking at Political Party for IDAHOBiT

 Just in our schools alone there is so much potential to create positive change – however the Youth 2000 research by the University of Auckland showed us that there was no change in the huge amount of bullying that young queer and trans students face in over ten years!

That statistic horrifies me because it shows the severe lack of care and action from government and education providers to do anything about it.

I want to challenge all of our politicians in the room tonight to be part of making a difference in this area. I believe these statistics can change.

Our takatāpui, fa’afafine, trans, bisexual, gay, lesbian, intersex, genderqueer young people aren’t going away – in fact more and more of us are opening up about our experiences and asking for respect. For the most part, our organisations and our young people know what needs to be done to make things better, we just ask you to please, please start listening.

You can make a donation to support InsideOUT’s work with young people here.

Seeking Rainbow Minorities Project Coordinator

Seeking Rainbow Minorities Project Coordinator

Part-time; fixed-term contract (three months), Wellington-based.

As InsideOUT’s Rainbow Minorities Project Coordinator you will have responsibility for coordinating and delivering a project working with young people to create a poster and video series about minorities within the rainbow community. A key part of this role also includes contributing to either the the graphic design and creation of the poster series for the project, or the film-making of the videos, dependent on the individual’s skills and experience.

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The project involves the planning and delivery of a series of posters and short videos highlighting the different identities that make up the rainbow community. The media will focus particularly on minorities within the spectrum eg. intersex, asexual, takatāpui, queer people with disabilities.
The poster/video series will aim to raise awareness about all the identities that make up our rainbow communities but don’t often get talked about. Posters and videos will be distributed to youth groups, schools and youth services. They will allow young people with minority identities in the rainbow community to see their identity validated and reflected back to them, making them feel more comfortable accessing support services they need.

The key responsibilities of this role are:

•    overseeing the coordination of the project
•    recruiting, managing and supporting youth volunteers
•    contribution to either the film-making or graphic design of the project, to a high professional standard
•    regular reporting to our National Coordinator and board
•    gathering feedback and completing an evaluation report for the project.

We are looking for someone with superb organising and communication skills (written and verbal) and experience in either film-making or graphic design. The ideal applicant will be self-motivated with strong time management skills, with proven experience planning and coordinating successful projects. Knowledge of the challenges faced by sexuality, sex, and gender minorities and experience in youth work and cultural competency would be an advantage. We are seeking someone who identifies with being a minority within our rainbow communities, and we encourage applications from people who feel they might fit this description in some way.

This is a contract for 99 hours, spread across three months (April-June). Days and times worked are negotiable. The successful applicant will be paid the living wage.
Contact us to view a full job description. E-mail your CV, cover letter and portfolio or examples of your graphic design/film work to hello@insideout.org.nz by the end of Thursday 6th April to apply.

Seeking a Kitchen Coordinator (Voluntary) for Shift Hui 2017!

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Job Description – Kitchen Coordinator, Shift Hui 2017 (Voluntary)

In brief: 13122819_811136699018390_8370065657590601674_o
InsideOUT needs a creative kitchen superstar to manage the kitchen roster, recipes, grocery shopping, and meal preparation for the 2017 Shift Hui in Porirua. The role will require about 10 hours work in the lead up to the hui, and then a further 4 days onsite at Horouta Marae for the hui which runs across Tuesday 18th – Friday 21st April 2017. This position is open to people of all ages.

The kitchen coordinator won’t be starting from scratch planning meals for a hundred people! We have meal lists and shopping lists from past hui, and the InsideOUT team will support the kitchen coordinator with their planning.

Role responsibilities:

  • Writing meal plans and compiling recipes for 3 breakfasts, 3 lunches, and 3 dinners as well as snacks for 100 people
  • Taking due consideration for dietary requirements and making sure everyone attending the hui will be able to eat what the kitchen provides
  • Organising kitchen rosters for the hui
  • Overseeing the kitchen volunteer group in a way that is efficient, respectful, and empowering
  • Sharing recipe information with volunteers and attendees
  • Compiling a comprehensive shopping list
  • Working with the Shift Hui Coordinator to stay within budget
  • Attending planning meetings with the Shift Hui Coordinator and other InsideOUT staff in the lead up to the hui

The ideal volunteer: 12188032_730841070381287_4863795681327177449_o

  • An enthusiastic cook who knows how to make exciting, nourishing, budget-friendly meals
  • Responsible and relaxed
  • A confident planner
  • Someone who knows how to organise their time
  • You don’t need to be a professional chef! You just need to know how to cook and have an enthusiasm for the role
  • Some hospitality experience would obviously be a bonus, but not necessarily essential, especially if you have experience hosting large events or working on marae

While the position is voluntary, any expenses such as travel will be reimbursed by InsideOUT

Please send a letter of interest to shift@insideout.org.nz ASAP!

Seeking Shift Hui Coordinator

Seeking Shift Hui Coordinator
Part-time contract position; fixed-term (four months), Wellington-based.

InsideOUT is a national youth charity seeking someone to coordinate our national youth hui, Shift.
You will be responsible for overseeing the planning and delivery of a national hui for young people aged 13-22, held across four days.

This will include developing and updating policies, managing and supporting volunteers and overseeing the overall coordination for the event. This includes things such as liaising with a venue, overseeing promotion and publicity, working with volunteers to develop the programme, menu and more. You will also be responsible for reporting regularly to our National Coordinator and board, gathering feedback, overseeing evaluation processes and reporting on these.

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InsideOUT is a growing organisation that works to support youth, whānau, schools, community groups, youth services, government agencies and other relevant organisations to provide safer schools and communities for young people of minority sexualities, sexes and genders. Shift is a hui (gathering) for young people of minority sexes, sexualities and genders that supports them to make connections, learn about different issues facing the rainbow community, take part in workshops and activities and gain new skills and knowledge to help them make their schools and communities a safer place.

We are looking for someone with superb organising and communication skills (written and verbal) who is able to stay calm under pressure and quickly solve problems. The ideal applicant will be self-motivated with strong time management skills, with proven experience planning and coordinating successful events. Knowledge of the challenges faced by sexual, sex, and gender minorities and experience in youth work and cultural competency would be an advantage. More information about the organisation is available on our website: insideout.org.nz

This is a contract for 200 hours, spread across four months (February-May) and paid in installments. Hours will build up over this time, with a significant amount of these taking place at the hui (April 21st-24th). Days and times worked outside of this are negotiable. The successful applicant will be paid the living wage.

Contact us to view a full job description. E-mail your CV and cover letter to hello@insideout.org.nz by Monday 16th January to apply.

Expression Arts Competition Winners Announced!

The results of Expression, InsideOUT’s first multi-media arts competition, are in, showing strong entries across three categories of art, writing and film.

“Part of our work is to bring more visibility to issues relating to people of minority sexualities, sexes and genders,” said Tabby Besley, National Coordinator of InsideOUT.

As part of this endeavour, InsideOUT launched Expression this year – a multi-media arts competition for young people aged 13-19.

an excerpt from Don't Look Now by Elliot Mckenzie
an excerpt from Don’t Look Now by Elliot Mckenzie

“We were aware that in some schools young people are discouraged to create artwork with rainbow themes and that often when they do, it isn’t understood or recognised appropriately,” said Tabby. “Expression intends to bring more visibility to artworks with rainbow themes that contain positive representations, challenge norms and confront LGBTQIA+ issues, and reward the young people who are creating this content.”

Entries to the art category were strong, seeing Clay Morrigan, an eighteen year-old from Auckland take out first prize for their comic called ‘Transition is Freedom’.

“Winning this means a ton to me because this makes me feel understood and valued as an artist and as a trans person,” said Clay. “It makes me feel like people appreciate my work and that it’s actually a possibility to reach and help a lot of people with my art. Thanks again to anyone who has supported me so far with my work, I wouldn’t be here without you.””

Transition is Freedom by Clay Morrigan
an excerpt from Transition is Freedom by Clay Morrigan

In second place for art was a piece called ‘Ignorance’ by Winter and third place went to Elliot Mckenzie for their comic ‘Don’t Look Now’.

Ignorance by Winter Kneale
Ignorance by Winter Kneale

Anthea Visage from Waikato won the top prize in the film category.

“REBORN was created for the queer youth who feel that they don’t have a voice. Ultimately it showcases the importance of unity, and the idea that we should support, accept and love one another no matter what,” she said. “We are all different, we are all diverse. But it is what makes us who we are.”

“Being a strong advocate for the LGBTQIA+ community, it means the absolute world to me that I have won InsideOUT’s Expression Film Competition. It has now given me the opportunity to share my art, in order to not only educate viewers, but to also give struggling transgender youth hope. I hope REBORN influences people in to be kind, and compassionate. I hope REBORN empowers queer youth, and most importantly, I hope REBORN inspires bravery.”

Jayden Hooper from Wellington came in second place for his artistic film ‘Others’, which explores heteronormativity.

In third place was Jay Whipps for their film ‘The Short Straw’, which documents Wellington Girls’ College student activist Josie Chambers and how she successfully pushed for her school to implement a gender neutral uniform option.

The writing category saw the most entries to the competition, and included a range of prose, poems, short stories and even a screenplay. First place went to Jennifer Alderton-Moss from Wellington, for her first-person prose, ‘Jenny’, which sees a young woman coming to terms with her sexuality and overcoming internalised biphobia.

“I fell in love with the whites of her eyes as they rode a roller coaster, looping around at something silly I had done, but always with a smile; always with that little hidden smile” – Jenny

Second place was awarded to Tymesha Cousins for her piece ‘Release Me’, about a closeted person coming out to the person they like. In third place was Miriam Roberts-Thomson for ‘Coffee Bliss’.

The three first place winners will each receive $500, with the runner ups receiving prizes thanks to sponsorship from Unity Books, The French Art Shop, Lighthouse Cinemas and Event Cinemas.

“We were overwhelmed by the time and effort put in by this year’s entrants and can’t wait to see how the competition grows over time,” said Tabby. “There was a huge amount of resilience in people’s experiences that rang through across all the submissions, and InsideOUT feels honoured to provide a platform to share these young people’s stories.”

All submissions will be gradually released on the Expression website over the next few weeks. The competition will be open again for submissions between 1st May-31st October 2017.

InsideOUT Wins at Wellington Airport Awards!

In August we were honoured to be the category winer for the Education and Child/Youth Development at the Wellington Airport Community Awards for Wellington City!

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Much to our surprise, we went on to win the overall award for the Wellington region in the same category at the Wellington Airport Community Award finals!

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A huge thanks to the Wellington Airport and Wellington Community Trust for their support of our work.

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And congratulations to all the other incredible groups who won awards and were nominated for their work in our communities!
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The Wellington Airport team came and made this awesome little film about us, giving you an overview of InsideOUT and some of our key projects!